The East African Revival

Author:
Kevin Ward
Published:
2010
Availability :
In Stock
The East African Revival emerged as an important movement within African Protestantism in the late 1920's and 1930's. It continues profoundly to influence the churches of East Africa to date. The revi...
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The East African Revival emerged as an important movement within African Protestantism in the late 1920's and 1930's. It continues profoundly to influence the churches of East Africa to date. The revival has two fold origins. The first relates to the dissatisfaction with the spiritual state of the native Anglican Church of Uganda. The other factor was the Rwanda Mission, which operated as an autonomous mission of the Church Missionary Society in South-Western Uganda.

The series of essays in this book spring out of a conference organized by Henry Martyn Center in 2008 to mark the establishment of the Joe Church Archive. They represent something of vigor and diversity of scholarship on the East African Revival, both in unpacking the Archive record which is Dr. Joe Church's legacy, and in exploring these other fascinating themes. Some of the essays illustrate how the genre of confession and testimony operates to establish and affirm what it means to be a member of the fellowship.


Kevin Ward & Emma Wild-Wood

The East African Revival: History and Legacies

About Authors


Kevin Ward taught in Uganda for a number of years and is now Senior
Lecturer in African Religious Studies in the Theology and Religious Studies
department, Leeds University. He is a widely published author.
Emma Wild-Wood taught in DR Congo and Uganda and is currently
Director of the Henry Martyn Centre, teaching in the Cambridge Theological
Federation and the University of Cambridge. She is commissioning editor of
the International Study Guide series for SPCK.


‘This is a remarkable and entertaining book, full of original materials. It is also a rare book partly or mainly because of the feel, or perhaps more accurately the smell, that the story it tells has all the hallmarks of both the truth and conviction. It is a story which everyone – Christian, Muslim or animist – should enjoy reading.’ – Prof. Phares M. Mutibwa